NOVEMBER IS DIABETES MONTH

ONE IN TEN AMERICANS HAVE DIABETES AND MORE THAN 80 MILLION ARE AT RISK OF DEVELOPING TYPE 2 DIABETES.

Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes cases continue to rise in people under the age of 20 in the United States, with higher rates of increase among racial/ethnic minority youth.

What can we do?

During the month of November every year, health professionals all over the country focus on providing even more information to increase diabetes awareness, how to live a healthier lifestyle to avoid getting diabetes and how to live a healthier life with diabetes.

Diabetes is a common chronic disease and results in increased risk for serious complications of the heart, kidneys, feet and eyes, among others. Efforts to understand the burden of this disease among different populations are essential to development of targeted public health efforts to help people at risk for or diagnosed with diabetes.

These are few simple steps we can take:

Maintain a healthy weight: Having a healthy weight for height and age can prevent or delay diabetes. Your healthcare provider can help you decide what weight is best for you to maintain.

Follow a healthy eating plan: Try to eat a food plan that includes lots of non-starchy vegetables, whole grains that are high in fiber, fresh fruits, lean proteins and low-fat dairy products.

Build a healthy plate: Fill half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables such as spinach, peppers, tomatoes, then one quarter of the plate choose lean protein such as poultry, fish or legumes, then lastly one quarter of your plate starches or carbs like brown rice, baked potatoes or whole grain bread.


Cut back on sweetened beverages such as juices or sodas: These drinks contain too much sugar which can increase weight and increase your chances of getting Diabetes.

Move Move Move: Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. Being active helps to maintain a healthy body weight and overall health. Start slowly to build up to your goal and make sure your healthcare provider is on board.

Get tested: Getting tested is very important to do especially if there is any family history of diabetes. Your healthcare provider can give you a simple blood test.

For more information and tips, please feel free to contact our Nutritionist at Sites 1, 2 or 3 who helps many people, including children, develop good eating habits.

STAY HEALTHY!

Viviana Bonilla
Clinical Nutritionist
Joseph P. Addabbo Family Health Center

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